“Fuchsleiten” Pinot Nero 2018 (Pfitscher)

Wine Card


Pfitscher’s Fuchsleiten clearly displays a trait that I take into high consideration regarding a wine’s quality: the balance between ambition and outcome. It stands out for its stylistic cleanliness respecting the typicality of the Pinot Noir grape, carefully avoiding falling into the wide array of lame imitations of the Burgundy’s model.
Rightly, this 2018 is still a little young in relation to its aging potential. Nevertheless the fragrant fruity freshness, together with a smooth mouthfeel, make it perfectly ready for those who appreciate a light-handed wine style.

Wine Details
Name and appellation: “Fuchsleiten” Pinot Nero Alto Adige DOC
Vintage: 2018
Producer: Pfitscher
Place of origin: Alto Adige (Italy)
Grape variety: Pinot Noir
Alcohol strength: 13% vol.


Appreciation Profile
Type: dry red
Style: subtle (light-handed and polished).
Varietal wine alike: Pinotage (South Africa), Pinot Noir (Oregon).
Food pairings: tenderloin, omelette, quiche, terrines, patés.
Aging potential: drink now through 2023.
Best value (reviewed vintage): price range €17 – €19 (0,75 L).


Sensory Analysis
1) Appearance (visual evaluation)
Clarity: neat
Color: ruby red
Saturation: light

2) Smell (olfactory evaluation)
Purity: definite
Fragrance: fragrant
Aroma (nose): fruity (strawberry, pomegranate), floral

3) Flavor (gustatory evaluation)
Balance: balanced
Sapidity: mild
Taste: dry, with a pinch of sour freshness
Aroma (mouth): fruity (red berries)
Structure: soft
Texture: lean

4) Aftertaste (overall conclusion)
Mouthfeel: smooth
Finish: lasting
Fruit: fresh
Alcohol: light
Evolution: ready
Complexity: fine


Etna Rosso 2015 (Madaudo)

Wine Card


Here’s another champion of price vs quality, recently picked in a large-scale distribution in Milan, Italy. Even if I might be biased for my natural inclination about the Etna Rosso appellation, it goes fairly easy to consider this wine a smart choice indeed. Precisely regarding the vintage 2015, which was marked by a burning hot summer that made up the alcoholic strength noticeably high. Nevertheless the wine is still quite elegant and balanced, as it shows cleanliness next to fruitiness.

Wine Details
Name and appellation: Barone di Bernaj, Etna Rosso DOC
Vintage: 2015
Producer: Madaudo
Place of origin: Sicily (Italy)
Grape variety: Nerello Mascalese (90%), Nerello Cappuccio (10%)
Alcohol strength: 15% vol.


Appreciation Profile
Type: dry red
Style: racy (lively and expressive)
Varietal wine alike: Sangiovese (Toscana, Ita), Aglianico del Vulture (Basilicata, Ita)
Food pairings: roast beef, grilled pork meat
Aging potential: drink now
Best value (reviewed vintage): price range €5 – €6 (0,75 L)


Sensory Analysis
1) Appearance (visual evaluation)
Clarity: neat
Color: ruby red
Saturation: vivid
2) Smell (olfactory evaluation)
Purity: clean
Fragrance: noticeable
Aroma (nose): fruity (red berries)
3) Flavor (gustatory evaluation)
Balance: accurate
Sapidity: mild
Taste: dry
Aroma (mouth): fruity, sligthly mineral
Structure: supple
Texture: lean
4) Aftertaste (overall conclusion)
Mouthfeel: moist
Finish: lasting
Fruit: juicy
Alcohol: strong
Evolution: mature
Complexity: likeable

Dolcetto Dogliani 2018 (Basecinque)

Wine Card


Surprisingly available on the shelves of a well-known Italian supermarket, this enjoyable Dogliani DOCG is the result of a not-so-common teamworking of four small, quality oriented winemakers, who have joined together to promote the knowledge of Dolcetto wine. Clean in its appearance of a vivid purple red as well as in the fruity (little red cherries) and delicately flowery aroma.
Sincere approach to the fundamentals of Dolcetto grape, this wine is as simple as refined, with a light handed touch which pairs well with a variety of easygoing dishes.

Wine Details
Name and appellation: Dolcetto Dogliani DOCG
Vintage: 2018
Producer: Basecinque
Place of origin: Piemonte (Italy)
Grape variety: Dolcetto
Alcohol strength: 13% vol.


Appreciation Profile
Type: dry red
Style: subtle (light-handed & polished)
Varietal wine alike: Teroldego Rotaliano (Trentino, Ita), Merlot (Veneto and Friuli, Ita)
Food pairings: charcuterie, pasta/risotto with porcini mushrooms, chicken and turkey
Aging potential: drink now
Best value (reviewed vintage): price range €5 – €6 (0,75 L)


Sensory Analysis
1) Appearance (visual evaluation)
Clarity: neat
Color: purplish red
Saturation: vivid
2) Smell (olfactory evaluation)
Purity: clean
Fragrance: noticeable
Aroma (nose): fruity (red cherry), floral (violet)
3) Flavor (gustatory evaluation)
Balance: accurate
Sapidity: mild
Taste: lightly sour
Aroma (mouth): fruity (red berries), floral
Structure: crisp
Texture: lean
4) Aftertaste (overall conclusion)
Mouthfeel: moist
Finish: lasting
Fruit: fresh
Alcohol: brisk
Evolution: mature
Complexity: likeable

Choosing the right wine at the supermarket

>> ITA

 

The lockdown pulled me back to the supermarket wine shelf… shall we talk about it?

You know, I have no prejudice towards the sale of wine in large-scale retail trade, it’s just that the most basic rules for the correct storage of wine cannot be respected inside a supermarket (temperature, humidity, lighting, noise).

 

Let’s speak about quality then, again based on objective criteria, those inspiring my motto “drink yourself smarter” (wine, of course ..). A “good” wine is first of all a “healthy” wine, well made, correct even if not necessarily a masterpiece.

 

Well, to produce healthy wines cost effort, as demonstrated by the commitment of small or medium producers who respect those cultivation (work in the vineyard) and winemaking (work in the cellar) practices that make the difference between a healthy wine and a sick one.

 

An example of sick wine? The one that instead of a good smell of the fruit from which it is made of, presents a bad smell deriving from the excess or absence of sulphites: in the first case it will smell of sulfur, in the second of something else not very recommendable and precisely because of the lack of an appropriate dose of preservative.

 

The consumer price of a bottle of wine obviously reflects the effort of the wine producer. As a matter of fact the price is one of the main objective indicators of the quality of a healthy wine, putting aside the so-called cult wines that enjoy the extra charge due to exclusivity. As well as may be superfluous to highlight that the average price of wines for sale (and sold) in large-scale distribution is dangerously low. For who? For the health of those who drink them, unfortunately!

 

I will continue to write on this topic, which I particularly care about and which I think deserves a thoughtful consideration by all those who love drinking wine.
Meanwhile, I refer my readers to the following blog and social posts in the “my WAY” category for the sensory evaluation of those wines I’ve picked from the shelf of a large-scale supermarket and which I would still recommend.

 


 

Il confinamento (alias lockdown) mi ha riportato davanti allo scaffale dei vini al supermercato… ne vogliamo parlare?

Sapete, non ho nulla di pregiudiziale verso la vendita di vino nella nella grande distribuzione; è solo che le più elementari norme per la corretta conservazione del vino non possono essere rispettate all’interno di un supermercato (temperatura, umidità, illuminazione, rumore).

Parliamo poi di qualità, anche in questo caso sulla base di criteri oggettivi, quelli che ispirano il mio motto “bevi in modo più intelligente” (il vino, s’intende..). Un vino “buono” è prima di tutto un vino “sano”, fatto bene, corretto anche se non necessariamente un capolavoro.

 

Un esempio di vino malato? Quello che al posto del buon odore del frutto da cui proviene, presenta invece il cattivo odore derivante dall’eccesso o dalla assenza di solfiti: nel primo caso puzzerà di zolfo, nel secondo di qualcos’altro poco raccomandabile, proprio per la mancanza di un’appropriata dose di conservante.

 

E’ naturale che la fatica del vignaiolo si rifletta nel prezzo del suo vino per il consumatore. Il prezzo rappresenta di fatto uno dei principali indicatori oggettivi della qualità di un vino sano, mettendo da parte i cosiddetti vini culto che godono del sovrapprezzo dovuto all’esclusività. Ed è superfluo evidenziare che il prezzo medio dei vini in vendita (e venduti) nella grande distribuzione sia pericolosamente basso. Per chi? Per la salute di chi li beve, purtroppo!

 

Riprenderò in seguito questo argomento a cui tengo particolarmente e che penso meriti un meditato approfondimento da parte di tutti coloro che amano bere vino.
Rimando i miei lettori ai prossimi post su blog e social nella categoria “my WAY” con l’analisi sensoriale dei vini selezionati tra quelli disponibili al supermercato e che mi sento di raccomandare.

“Marsen” Barbera 2011 (Pomodolce)

Wine Card


The characteristic juiciness of Barbera grape is taken to extremes in this powerful wine. Looks immediately strong at first sight due to a thick body in a dark red dress, that lightens slightly at the rim as a sign of maturity. On the nose the aroma is noticeable but not as deep as the flavour on the palate, markedly focused on ripe berries not without herbaceous hints that persist in a long bitterish finish. Unconventionally bold Barbera, suitable for those who appreciate a vigorous rustic style of wine.

Wine Details
Name and appellation: “Marsen” Colli Tortonesi Monleale 2011 DOC
Vintage: 2011
Producer: Pomodolce
Place of origin: Piedmont (Italy)
Grape variety: Barbera
Alcohol strength: 15.5% vol.


Appreciation Profile
Type: dry red
Style: bold (hefty and opulent)
Varietal wine alike: Cabernet Sauvignon (Italy, California, Australia), Carmenere (Chile, Argentina)
Food pairings: grilled, smoked red meats and game
Aging potential: drink now through 2022
Best value (reviewed vintage): price range €20 – €25 (0,75 L)


Sensory Analysis
1) Appearance (visual evaluation)
Clarity: clear
Color: ruby red
Saturation: dark
2) Smell (olfactory evaluation)
Purity: clean
Fragrance: noticeable
Aroma (nose): fruity (sour cherry, wild berries), herbaceous
3) Flavor (gustatory evaluation)
Balance: accurate
Sapidity: rich
Taste: sour with a bittersweet finish
Aroma (mouth): fruity (ripe berries), herbaceous, slightly oaky
Structure: crisp
Texture: thick
4) Aftertaste (overall conclusion)
Mouthfeel: smooth
Finish: long
Fruit: mellow
Alcohol: strong
Evolution: mature
Complexity: rustic

“Huberfeld” Merlot 2015 (St.Pauls)

Wine Card


There’s never been a better time to finally open my last bottle of Merlot “Huberfeld” 2015, that I left carefully aging to reach full maturity. I’ve tasted this vintage for the first time in the spring of 2018, during my usual wine selection tour in South Tyrol, northern Italy. Today, as then, I can appreciate its intriguing sensory profile, which pairs the featuring drinkability of merlot grape with the distinctive character of a wine that can really please even the most refined palates.

Wine Details
Name and appellation: “Huberfeld” Merlot Alto Adige DOC
Vintage: 2015
Producer: St. Pauls
Place of origin: Alto Adige (Italy)
Grape variety: Merlot
Alcohol strength: 13.5% vol.


Appreciation Profile
Type: dry red
Style: racy (lively and expressive)
Varietal wine alike: Corvina (Valpolicella, Ita), Montepulciano (Abruzzo, Ita)
Food pairings: roast beef, pasta with meat sauce
Aging potential: drink now
Best value (reviewed vintage): price range €13 – €15 (0,75 L)


Sensory Analysis
1) Appearance (visual evaluation)
Clarity: neat
Color: purplish red
Saturation: deep
2) Smell (olfactory evaluation)
Purity: definite
Fragrance: noticeable
Aroma (nose): fruity (cherry, soft fruits)
3) Flavor (gustatory evaluation)
Balance: accurate
Sapidity: mild
Taste: dry
Aroma (mouth): fruity (red and black berries), slightly oaky
Structure: supple
Texture: lean
4) Aftertaste (overall conclusion)
Mouthfeel: smooth
Finish: lasting
Fruit: mellow
Alcohol: brisk
Evolution: mature
Complexity: likeable

Barolo Rocche di Castelletto 2012 (Cascina Chicco)

Wine Card


Barolo is one of the finest wines (appellation of origin) in the world. So, it is not surprising that it can be fairly expensive and also rather complex to appreciate, therefore not fully suitable for all palates and budgets. Well, this is not the case for Cascina Chicco’s Barolo “Rocche di Castelletto” 2012, which stands out for drinkability and affordability.
Characterized by light garnet appearance and fragrant aroma of berries and sweet flowery notes, it shows an accurate balance of fruitiness and lightness of touch. The style is elegant, as broad as gentle.

#myWAY barolo red wine

Wine Details
Name and appellation: Rocche di Castelletto Barolo DOCG
Vintage: 2012
Producer: Cascina Chicco
Place of origin: Piedmont (Italy)
Grape variety: Nebbiolo


Appreciation Profile
Type: dry red
Style: elegant
Varietal wine alike: Pinot Noir (Russian Valley, CA), Carignano (Sardinia, Ita)
Food pairings: lamb, beef filet
Aging potential: drink now through 2022
Best value (reviewed vintage): price range €35 – €40 (0,75 L)


Sensory Analysis
1) Appearance (visual evaluation)
Clarity: neat
Color: orange red (garnet)
Saturation: light
2) Smell (olfactory evaluation)
Purity: definite
Fragrance: fragrant
Aroma (nose): fruity (blueberry, soft fruits), floral (violet)
3) Flavor (gustatory evaluation)
Balance: balanced
Sapidity: sapid
Taste: dry
Aroma (mouth): floral (sweet hints of wildflowers), fruity (red berries)
Structure: supple
Texture: lean
4) Aftertaste (overall conclusions)
Mouthfeel: moist
Finish: lasting
Fruit: juicy
Alcohol: brisk
Evolution: mature
Complexity: likeable

“Orio” Bolgheri DOC 2017 (Podere Il Castellaccio)

Wine Card


Made on the Tuscan coast around Bolgheri, one of the most trending vineyards of Italy, this Bordeaux-like red blend is a remarkable opportunity to drink smarter. Its fragrant aroma of dark berries, balanced by a long lasting sapid taste, reveals the fruit ripeness of a warm vintage. Body is supple and full with a pretty smooth mouthfeel. Here’s a wine with an elegant style, although more flavorful than graceful.

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Details
Name and appellation: “Orio” Bolgheri DOC
Vintage: 2017

Producer: Podere il Castellaccio
Place of origin: Tuscany (Italy)
Grape variety: Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Syrah

Profile
Type: dry red
Style: elegant

Food pairings: steaks and chops, pasta with boar ragù
Aging potential: drink now through 2022
Best value: price range €16 – €18 (0,75 L)

Duc de Sauternes 2015 (Maison du Sauternes)

Wine Card


Produced with the widespread contribution of all the over 80 winemakers participating in the Maison of Sauternes (must visit with free tasting), this botrytized sweet wine expresses with simplicity the typical characteristics of such a famous appellation as Sauternes Contrôlée. Bright appearance of a deep straw yellow color, fragrant notes of citrus, wild flowers and aromatic herbs along with a flavor rich in sweetness and viscosity, just a little too fleeting on the finish. But how can we expect more from this entry level champion of quality and price?

Details
Name and appellation: Duc de Sauternes – Appellation Sauternes Controlée
Vintage: 2016

Producer: Maison du Sauternes
Place of origin: Sauternes (France)
Grape variety: Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc

Profile
Type: sweet white
Style: bold (hefty and opulent)

Food pairings: spicy blue cheese, dry pastries, dried fruit
Aging potential: drink now through 2025
Best value: price €15 (direct sale only)

Rosso di Montepulciano DOC 2017 (Poliziano)

Appreciation Profile


Appellation: Rosso di Montepulciano DOC

Vintage: 2017

Producer: Poliziano

Place of origin: Tuscany (Italy)

Pattern: red Tuscan blend

Varietal: Sangiovese 80% – Merlot 20%

Style: potent (broad & forceful)

Suitability: likable (medium complexity)

Aging potential: drink now through 2022

Flavor: fruity and herbaceous aroma, tasteful with a supple body

Pairing: red grilled or stewed meat (beef, game), pasta with meat sauce, mature sheep cheese (pecorino)

Price: best value in the range of €9 – €12 a bottle of 0,75lt